Category Archives: Batman

CA Reviews: Batman – Return of the Caped Crusaders

Standard

B-RotCC.png

Batman – Return of the Caped Crusaders is the first DCAU film I’ve even remotely had a desire to watch in the past year or two. After the godawful Son of Batman, Batman vs. Robin, Killing Joke CCCCC-combo I was not looking forward to wasting another 90 minutes on DC’s weird fetish with making Batman as lame as possible on film (BvS: DoJ deserves a lot of credit for my hate here as well, but I digress). Regardless, the central conceit – that they were making this as a tongue-in-cheek love letter to the 60’s television show was enough to pull me back in. The good news is that it wasn’t a wasted trip, because this is the first Batman film in a long time that didn’t leave me feeling like I don’t even enjoy the character anymore. “Return of the Caped Crusaders” isn’t perfect, mind you, but it was good enough to warrant its existence, which is increasingly rare for me to admit in today’s Batverse.

Full disclosure: I’ve always loved the 60’s television show. Growing up in the 80’s the reruns were on television frequently so I watched pretty much the entire run as a child. As I matured and really started understanding Batman as the character portrayed in the comics of the 80’s and 90’s, I realized the 60’s show was completely ridiculous. Yet that didn’t make me dislike it one iota, it just was… I had read Gold and Silver-age Batman comics and enjoyed them. The campy, ridiculous Surrealism of it all was great fun and I never once stopped to think “Why isn’t he brooding more?”….

My chief complaint with Batman and the subculture of fans which are so heavily invested in it, is the way in which said fans obstinately proclaim Batman to be one singular thing. In most cases, it can be described as “dark”. Yes – the idea that a grown man dressed in a Bat costume punching evil clowns must be taken deadly serious. How absurd and boring. Blah. Now Batman in films, games and comics is some sort of hulking, armor-clad Militarized idiot who never deduces anything beyond the obvious and solves every problem with punching and guns.

knightmare_batsuit

Yes – I know it was a goddamned dream sequence

Now, don’t get me wrong – I love “dark” Batman – IF it is told well… because here’s the thing: I just like well told stories.

Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

The End… or, The Ouroboros Finally Swallows its’ Tail

Standard

Batman Inc 013-008

With today’s release of Batman Incorporated, Volume II, #13, Grant Morrison has officially ended his long, seven year(!) tenure on Batman. It has been an incredible ride and for my money, it still stands as the greatest, most intricate, thoughtful and subversive story the character has ever been proxy for.

The real question on everyone’s mind though – did this final ‘double-sized’ issue deliver the payoff that those seven years rightfully deserve? Well…

That’s impossible, right?

Read the rest of this entry

CA Reviews: Batman Incorporated Vol.2 #12

Standard

Batman Inc 11 variant

Jeez, that was a long wait. After last month’s wacky surprise pit-stop in the land of Burnham’s Japan, we finally return to the root story – and thank goodness, it was mostly worth the wait.

Read the rest of this entry

CA Reviews: Batman Incorporated Vol.2 #11

Standard

Batman Incorporated 011 cover

What the fuck did I just read?

Seriously, with this internet 3.0 shit again?

The only other issue of Morrison’s ginormous Batman run thus far that I’ve felt this way about was Vol.1 #8, which also felt the need to try and make “internet 3.0” a cool thing. Well, this story is better than the last… but how much and does it really matter if it is just a polished turd? Read on and find out in the full Batman Incorporated #11 review!

Read the rest of this entry

CA Reviews: Batman Incorporated Vol.2 #10

Standard

inc 10 cover

Well, as always we have a lot going on in this issue – so let’s get to it!

SPOILERS AHEAD!

Read the rest of this entry

CA Reviews: Batman Incorporated Vol.2 #9

Standard

Batman Inc 09

Well, Batman Inc. is kind of getting short shrift from me this month due to other engagements, so this is a stream of consciousness review and not heavily edited – yet, come on, you know what I’m going to say… but hell, continue on reading anyway!

Read the rest of this entry

CA Reviews: Batman Incorporated Vol.2 #8

Standard

cover1

Rest in peace this time? Not Rot in purgatory? Let’s hope.

It’s been spoiled to high heaven already – but this is it, Morrison destroys his creation.

Click through to join in on the memorial –

Read the rest of this entry

Grant Morrison on Fatman on Batman

Standard

grant-morrison

If you haven’t heard it yet, head over to Kevin Smith’s Smodcast site and listen to the fantastic interview he has up with Grant Morrison. Part one is there now, with part two coming later in the week.

I really enjoyed the discussion and I think a lot of Morrison detractors will find it difficult to continue dismissing him for the eccentricities that they like harping on him for, if they hear him lucidly explain the why and the how of the kookier legends out there concerning his ‘trips’ and whatnot. Sure it is still all a bit… odd, to say the least. But I’ll be damned if I’ve ever heard someone tell a story like that and still come off sounding reasonable and open-minded about the entire thing.

A few highlights:

(@1:06:00) On the story he was telling in ‘Arkham Asylum: A Serious House On Serious Earth‘:

“This is Bruce Wayne, when he goes to bed at 8 in the morning, this is what he dreams every night. That’s it. It wasn’t meant to be, ‘this actually happened’, this is Bruce Wayne’s dreams this is what happens all the time in that man’s head.”

Smith is a bit blown back by hearing this for the first time, surprising himself when he realizes that he never really knew if it was canon or not.  Morrison continues:

“But it’s a canon dream, it’s the ultimate dream of Batman so you need to know it because that’s what Bruce dreams like; and it’s horrible and he’s ineffectual in a lot of cases, and everything’s a reflection of himself.”

 

Then, at the very tail end of the podcast, in a preview for this week’s second part, while discussing Miller’s TDKR, Morrison explains his thoughts on the ‘psychopathic, dark Batman’ that took hold after Miller’s hugely successful novel – and in turn – how he himself sees and writes the character:

“I like things to make sense, and for me, growing up reading Denny O’Neil and all that stuff, Batman for me was a guy who had been all around the world and he’d had all these amazing fetish girls chasing him, he was super rich, he had the best toys in the world and what he’d done is dealt with his trauma in a very unusual way, but it was a way that totally worked for this guy. …He made it work, he didn’t just get drunk, destroy his life and blow the fortune; he made it useful – and I think, okay, we have to accept that if he’s a super martial arts master and master of meditation and he can slow down his breath and survived for an hour in a coffin… people say ‘well, you’re doing Batgod’, to me I’m being real about who this guy would be at this point in his life. I have to acknowledge, this is the fucking Batman, you know, and he can do all this stuff and honestly, you don’t go through courses in Buddhist meditation and come out an asshole at the end… if you do it right, you know.

So I thought Batman was the most sorted, together, humanist icon on the planet – and that’s where I found myself kind of falling out with people who thought he was tortured, or damned, or depressed, or unable to assuage that guilt. I thought … every night he went out, he dealt with that guilt and just ‘okay, I’m making things better’. So I saw him fundamentally positive and mentally positive and able to inspire people.”

That right there encapsulates the Batman that I grew up reading as well – and to me, explains why Morrison’s characterization rings most true for my tastes; I also see Batman as a healthy and positive character and I am in total agreement with Mr. Morrison that, for the character to truly work, he has to be.

The whole interview was a joy  and is just some brilliantly fun stuff to listen to – give it a look and be sure to check back later this week on the Smodcast site for part two!

Batman is stupid…

Standard

at least according to Scott Snyder…

BM_Cv17

Spoilers ahead as we take a look at the epic finale of “The Death of the Family” arc with Batman #17!

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-Page

Standard

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

 

CA Reviews: Batman Incorporated Vol. 2 # 4

Standard

My unbridled love for Grant Morrison’s Batman is very well documented by now, so if you don’t want to hear this giddy cheerleader shout out a long-winded rally for the team, then please, go read some other comic blog… all you’re going to get from here on out is an extended fangasm… because really, this issue deserves it.

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-Page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman #227 – Writer: Denny O’Neil – Artists: Irv Novick and Dick Giordano)

Top Ten Geeky Hallowe’en Costumes

Standard

It’s that time of the year again: time to promote juvenile diabetes! Also time to relish the chance for an increasingly non-secular nation to dip their toes into the dark side and openly venerate ghosts, demons, monsters and all things horrific. Halloween! Fuck yeah!

After trudging through innumerable “sexy ___fillintheblank___” costumes, I thought it may be wise to cut through some of the noise by listing what I’ve found online this year to be the coolest geeky Halloween costumes:

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

 

(Batman: Nosferatu – Writers: Randy & Jean-Marc Lofficier – Artist: Ted McKeever)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman, Hellboy, Starman #1 – Writer: James Robinson – Artist: Mike Mignola)

 

 

Monday Bat-page

Standard

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman Incorporated #0 – Writer: Grant Morrison/Chris Burnham – Artist: Frazier Irving)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman: Earth One – Writer: Geoff Johns – Artist: Gary Frank)

Monday Bat-Page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman: Through the Looking Glass – Writer: Bruce Jones – Artist: Sam Kieth)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman: Night Cries – Writer: Archie Goodwin – Artist: Scott Hampton)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne #2 – Writer: Grant Morrison – Artist: Frazer Irving)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman/Joker: Switch – Writer: Devin Grayson – Artist: John Bolton)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman #668 – Writer: Grant Morrison – Artist: J.H. Williams III)

CA Reviews: Batman Incorporated Vol. 2 #3

Standard

Holy disappearing Bat-book! There are SPOILERS after the jump! Since most of you definitely haven’t read this issue yet, I’ll  say it again, just to make it perfectly clear:

SPOILERS AHEAD!!!

Read the rest of this entry

Batman #11

Standard

Notice I’m not calling this a review? That’s because I just cannot find the energy to write a full-on, proper review. I’ve also been trying really hard to not write any negative articles for the site – but after reading the issue a few times and then seeing CBR’s absurdly vague 4 1/2 star corporate ball-licking “review” that didn’t even attempt to mention the story telling, I just couldn’t help it. I felt compelled to rant a bit.

So, please, allow me to level with you right off the bat so that you may either stop reading and/or start writing your hate mail: I think Scott Snyder has successfully completed the worst “big event” Batman story that I have ever read.

Read the rest of this entry

Aside

I present to you the BTAS  series bible.

For those unaware of what a “series bible” is:

from Wikipedia

Show bibles are commonly used in television series; new writers and freelancers are often referred to it when writing scripts for the show to ensure continuity with previous episodes; they’re also used by individual writers for books and movies to keep track of details.

BTAS – Series Bible

Right click to ‘save as’ and download and/or read the thing with a left click

Batman The Animated Series – The Series Bible

Some Quick Thoughts On Batman Inc. Vol. 2 #1

Standard

This isn’t a proper review, rather just a quick sketch of what I thought of my most anticipated book of 2012.

I plan on doing full annotations on the whole run, so that will come soon, but for now this is all I have time for before I leave town for a week and wander around the wilderness without computers or cell phones.

Spoilers ahead!

Read the rest of this entry

The Top Ten Batman Covers from Each Era (Part 4 – The Modern Age)

Standard

This week we are going to break down what we believe to be the best Batman covers from each era of comic book history – so expect this to be broken into four different parts encompassing:

Golden Age (c.1938 – c.1950)

Silver Age (1956 – c.1970)

Bronze Age (c.1970 – c.1985)

Modern Age (1985 – present)

Today we move on to our final list

THE TOP TEN MODERN AGE BATMAN COVERS:

Read the rest of this entry

The Top Ten Batman Covers from Each Era (Part 3 – The Bronze Age)

Standard

This week we are going to break down what we believe to be the best Batman covers from each era of comic book history – so expect this to be broken into four different parts encompassing:

Golden Age (c.1938 – c.1950)

Silver Age (1956 – c.1970)

Bronze Age (c.1970 – c.1985)

Modern Age (1985 – present)

Today we move on to

THE TOP TEN BRONZE AGE BATMAN COVERS:

Read the rest of this entry

The Top Ten Batman Covers from Each Era (Part 2 – The Silver Age)

Standard

This week we are going to break down what we believe to be the best Batman covers from each era of comic book history – so expect this to be broken into four different parts encompassing:

 Golden Age (c.1938 – c.1950)

Silver Age (1956 – c.1970)

Bronze Age (c.1970 – c.1985)

Modern Age (1985 – present)

Today we move on to

THE TOP TEN SILVER AGE BATMAN COVERS:

Read the rest of this entry

The Top Ten Batman Covers from Each Era (Part 1 – The Golden Age)

Standard

This week we are going to break down what we believe to be the best Batman covers from each era of comic book history – so expect this to be broken into four different parts encompassing:

 Golden Age (c.1938 – c.1950)

Silver Age (1956 – c.1970)

Bronze Age (c.1970 – c.1985)

Modern Age (1985 – present)

Today however,  we shall begin with

THE TOP TEN GOLDEN AGE BATMAN COVERS:

Read the rest of this entry

Batman University, Anti-Theism, Moby Dick and Trite Nostalgia: Batman on the Couch (Prelude)

Standard

This is a bit of an oddity.  Back in December of 2011 I was asked to expound upon some general questions I had previously answered for a genial fellow working on a collegiate assignment. The answers I provided were to be worked into some sort of thesis and I was told that the final paper would be passed on to me, so that I could see how my input was put to use. I’ve never seen that paper.

Regardless, I think some of the topics broached here are mildly interesting and I plan to further extrapolate on a few of the answers I provided in the near future; Specifically the notion that the character of Batman stands as an undeniably (and perhaps singular) anti-theistic superhero. I also find it somewhat funny that I make mention of a hypothetical sequel to Moby Dick not being able to ruin the original work, since recently, Alan Moore used the same analogy a bit differently.

In any event, here are some words I wrote about Batman back in December:

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-Page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

*Since I skipped last week I’ve put up a two page splash; it counts for two… so we’re caught up.*

(Batman #68 – Writer: Grant Morrison – Artist: Tony Daniel)

Monday Bat-Page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman 428 – Writer: Jim Starlin – Artist: Jim Aparo)

CA Reviews: Batman #5

Standard

Batman #5 – Writer: Scott Snyder – Artist: Greg Capullo

I think I’ve gone mad.

Everyone else I’ve heard speaking of this issue has lobbied some extreme, hysterical hyperbole at it such as “The greatest script of Snyder’s career” or that it is one of the best Batman issues ever written. What? Maybe I read a different book, or maybe I’m just not as blown away by the rather gimmicky page flipping component of the book as others are, because, from what I read – I was thoroughly nonplussed.

SPOILERS Ahead! Abandon all hope, ye who enter here

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(The Batman of Arkham – Writer: Alan Grant – Artist: Alcatena

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman: Absolution – Writer: J.N. Dematteis – Artist: Brian Ashmore )

A Reader’s Guide To Grant Morrison’s Batman

Standard

Well, not ALL of Grant Morrison’s Batman; his stand alone stories are not discussed here – only the currently in progress epic, which will continue on during 2012/2013’s relaunched Batman Inc.

If there is one question I’ve answered more than any other in the past few years in regards to Batman, it is “what is the reading order of Grant Morrison’s run”, or some variation thereof. So I have created this list as a permanent resource and answer to that question. I’ve also created this list for my own edification, to satiate my own disturbingly deep love for Morrison’s Bat tale.

This will hopefully be a straightforward, simple and easy to follow chronological list that will tell you the reading order and supply you with visual representations of all the comics that make up the run, to help the die hard, single issue collectors out there. (I’ve pictured all variant versions of issues below, but not all re-printings where the only thing that changed was a color tone shift and I’ve also put this list here as pure text, just in case you simply want to copypasta it onto your phone, etc. for use in comic shops.)

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-page

Standard

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman & Nightwing: Bloodborne – Writer: Kelley Puckett – Artist: Toby Cypress

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Castle of the Bat – Writer: Jack C. Harris Artist: by Bo Hampton)

CA Reviews: Batman Inc. Leviathan Strikes!

Standard

MANY SPOILERS AHEAD! TURN BACK NOW IF YOU HAVEN’T READ THIS BOOK!

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman: Noel – Writer and Artist: Lee Bermejo

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Gotham Noir – Writer: Ed Brubaker – Artist: Sean Phillips)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman Arkham Asylum: A Serious House On Serious Earth – Writer: Grant Morrison – Artist: Dave McKean)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

("Ego" Written and Drawn by Darwyn Cooke)

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Trinity #2 – Written and Drawn by Matt Wagner)

Top Ten Episodes of Batman: The Brave And The Bold

Standard

Today marks the end of a great era in Batman history – Batman: The Brave and the Bold leaves the air today… the last new episode in the now cancelled series airs tonight in the United States.

I have a very unpopular opinion about this show: I think it is the best Batman cartoon ever made. Yes, that means I think it is superior to the much beloved Batman: The Animated Series.

Why, you ask, as you sharpen your pitchforks and light your torches? Well, let me see if I can quickly explain my reasoning for this…

The Brave and the Bold contained more intelligence, humor, DC comics history and glorious fan-service easter eggs than pretty much any superhero cartoon ever made, let alone BTAS. How’s that for starters? The reason so many people rallied against this show is primarily due to the fact that it “looked kiddie” – yes, people are so concerned with asserting their maturity that they tend to reject certain aesthetics out of hand, simply because they offend their delicate sensibilities.  I believe that to be a supremely absurd position to take in life, but that’s a topic for another time. In a broad sense, I can empathize with this sort of outlook; we all have our tastes and there is nothing wrong with not giving something a chance because you’re not intrigued by the aesthetic (I’m looking at you “The Batman”).

Yet in a more specific context I’m not sure it comes down to simply the style of the animation here… what I think it comes down to is the odd perception people have of Batman. The character is one of the most fiercely imposed upon in all of comics history it seems… within the past few decades the majority of the fan base has become vitriolic in their response to anything that doesn’t represent the character as “dark”, “gritty” and “realistic”… again, let’s keep in mind that this is a man who dresses in a bat costume and makes gadgets that look like little bats to help him beat up brainwashing gorillas and steroid enhanced luchadors. Yeah, it’s pretty silly when you look at it objectively.

One of the reasons that I think Grant Morrison has written what amount to the greatest Batman stories ever told is because he understood the inherent silliness of the character. He knows the history; the majority of Batman representations contain absolutely ridiculous elements – and he loves it. He loves and reveres it and he managed to supplant those into a modern vernacular, he doesn’t reject the goofy Silver age zaniness, he embraces it wholly and mightily re-incorporates it into the mythos. In short – he respects the history of the character; he doesn’t shun it and pretend it didn’t exist. Of course, he only gets away with this because he’s such a good writer. I’ve always thought that if Grant Morrison were to create an all-ages Batman cartoon, it would be exactly like BTBATB was. It was smart, laden with meta references and it was never afraid to not take itself deadly serious.

This was a show that paid respectful and loving homage to, pretty much, every conceivable iteration of Batman – spanning across all media; comics, movies, television, etc. The whole show was basically a love letter to die-hard Batman fans.

This was a show that embraced the unbridled insanity that is the DC universe, relished the absurdity of the long history full of campy and dramatic heroes and villains – and this was a show that did it all with a surrealist’s humor and a wry tongue-in-cheek intelligence. Best yet, it managed this without talking down to kids, it managed to pack each episode with enough content to please parents and children at the same time; this is the Pixar of animated Batman shows. Plus, far before Geoff Johns rebooted him, any frequent viewer of this show already new Aquaman was cool as hell. Any show that has the voice of Bender playing the most hated and ridiculed superhero, pretty much ever, has won me as a viewer before I ever watch a single frame. Actually – when one gets right down to it, I think it may even be safe to say it has the most impressive voice cast of any superhero cartoon ever = Holy shit that’s a lot of amazing people.

Enough blather though, let’s get to the meat and potatoes.

Take a short stroll down memory lane with me and have a look at what I consider to be the pinnacle of Batman on television with my list of the

Top Ten Episodes of

Batman: The Brave And The Bold

 

(It was VERY difficult for me to limit the list to just ten episodes, I started out with 25 that I thought just had to be on here – this show rarely had a sub-par episode)

– SPOILERS AHEAD

Read the rest of this entry

CA Reviews: Batman #3

Standard

Batman #3 - Writer: Scott Snyder - Artist: Greg Capullo

Now that we’re really starting to get settled into these initial “New 52” arcs I’m beginning to enjoy myself much more. The pressure seems to be off; the creative teams are no longer here to awkwardly re-introduce these characters to pre-existing and new fans with sky-high expectations anymore and as such, the books are feeling (at least to me) like they’re settling into their respective grooves. I’ve grown to enjoy some of the books I initially disliked because of a lackluster number one. Of course, Batman was not one of those books… its’ first issue was one of the handful of really great New 52 titles and happily, it has only improved since.

Read the rest of this entry

CA Interview: Landry Q. Walker

Standard

 We recently were able to sit down and chat with writer Landry Q. Walker after randomly “meeting” him on Reddit.

We spoke about his long career in the comic book industry; the idea of being, perhaps mistakenly,  known as a “children’s” writer, his work with DC, Disney , Slave Labor Graphics and touched on topics such as madness, misconception, business, collaboration, Dick Grayson and She-Hulk.

CA: How long have you been in the Comics game?

LQW: My first mini-comic was released in January of 1993. The first work I actually got paid for was probably 1995.

CA: How did you “break in” and how long did that arduous process take you?

LQW: It depends on what you count as “breaking in”. My first work for DC wasn’t until 2008. But before that I spent years working on Disney Adventures Magazine and before that had a very successful series with SLG and before that some well reviewed mini-comics.

In a way, I’d say there is no such thing as breaking in…. especially these days. You have an idea, you do it. I published my own comics in the early 90’s and that qualified me as a professional. Because people with money saw my work, I became a paid professional. Some day, they’ll stop paying me for work – and then what will I be?  The arduous process never ends.

CA: Most of your work is done under the auspice of being “kids” comic books, has that stigma been something that has dogged you in a negative way through your career? Do you feel relegated, as though you sometimes aren’t taken seriously in the industry because of some of the genres you write in? Does your past body of work make it difficult for you to write more, generally,  “adult” books?

LQW: My earliest work was extremely adult, and I met a fair bit of skepticism that I could write kids stuff. Then I started writing Little Gloomy and people immediately associated me with kids stuff. You are whatever your last project is. So in a way, the answer is yes. I know for a fact that some major editors have expressed extreme skepticism over my ability to produce serious work. I’ve also received a lot of work because of my all-ages writing. No matter what you do, someone will doubt your ability to do something even slightly different.

Thing is, my goal has never been to do good all-ages comics or good adult comics, but instead to do good comics. The basics of storytelling are the same no matter what age group you attempt to reach. And often times the difference between all-ages and adult is much slimmer than most people believe.

CA: Do you even want to write “adult” comics or are you happy writing for the younger set?

LQW: I don’t think I’d ever be happy doing only one kind of story or aiming for one audience. The all-ages work I have produced has always had a true “all-ages” audience in mind. But then you look at my issue of the Joker’s Asylum series… very adult. Not what people seemed to expect of me.

CA: Ah! I actually have that book in my collection- and I must admit, embarrassingly, that I didn’t even recall that you had written it! But I love that story; I still think it is one of the best modern Mad Hatter stories out there. Very dark. You managed to capture an alarmingly authentic feeling of utter madness there; Jervis was just unnerving in that story. Apologies, but I have to gush a bit and just tell you, great work! Now why the hell has DC never hired you to write another “adult” Batman story?

Read the rest of this entry

Monday Bat-page

Image

Every Monday I’ll post a random, but fantastic, page from a Batman comic – this will improve all of our weeks.

No context, no commentary, just:

(Batman #455 – Writer: Alan Grant – Artist: Norm Breyfogle)